Genre: Folk

Parker Millsap

Parker Millsap

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request.  Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.


ABOUT PARKER MILLSAP

The fifth album from Oklahoma-bred singer/songwriter Parker Millsap, Be Here Instead emerged from a wild alchemy of instinct, ingenuity, and joyfully determined rule-breaking. In a departure from the guitar-and-notebook-based approach to songwriting that shaped his earlier work, the Nashville-based artist followed his curiosity to countless other modes of expression, experimenting with everything from piano to effects pedals to old-school drum machines (a fascination partly inspired by the early-’70s innovations of Sly Stone and J.J. Cale). As those explorations deepened and broadened his musical vision, Millsap soon arrived at a body of work touched with both unbridled imagination and lucid insight into the search for presence in a chaotic world.

Produced by John Agnello (Kurt Vile, Sonic Youth, Waxahatchee) and mainly recorded live with Millsap’s full band, Be Here Instead marks a stylistic shift from the gritty and high-energy folk of his previous output, including 2018’s acclaimed Other Arrangements and 2016’s The Very Last Day (an Americana Music Association Awards nominee for Album of the Year). With its adventurous yet immaculately detailed sonic palette, the album warps genres to glorious effect, at one point offering up what Millsap aptly refers to as a “disco-Americana showtune.” In another creative breakthrough, Be Here Instead forgoes the character-driven storytelling of his past in favor of a more introspective and endlessly revelatory form of lyricism, an element he traces back to the charmed nature of his songwriting process. “Because the lyrics were appearing seemingly out of nowhere and with no prior intent, some of them started to feel like transmissions from my subconscious, rather than the preconceived linear stories or waking thoughts of my earlier songs,” says Millsap. “They feel like words I needed to hear from myself, and not just things I wanted to say to someone else.”

On “The Real Thing”—the luminous lead single to Be Here Instead—Millsap presents a brilliant introduction to the album’s kaleidoscopic sound, merging the song’s cascading guitar lines and potent grooves with a tender statement of devotion (e.g., “I been through your roses, honey/I don’t mind the thorns”). Sparked from an experiment in open tuning and featuring guest vocals from Erin Rae, the track gracefully transforms a moment of private longing into a bit of prescient commentary. “I wrote ‘The Real Thing’ when I was touring and missing my wife, and hating how being on FaceTime doesn’t feel anything like being in the same room,” says Millsap. “But then as 2020 happened, the lyrics grew new teeth—now it’s much more of a reflection of how hard it is to experience any spontaneous interaction when everything happens on livestreams and Zoom.”

In its candid meditation on the intricacies of connection, Be Here Instead also delivers standouts like “Vulnerable,” a lushly textured piece of psychedelic soul threaded with elegantly simple wisdom. “I wrote that one when I was newly married,” says Millsap. “Something about standing in front of a room of people and saying ‘This is the one’ gave everything an extra weight, and made me think about how I’m still learning to openly communicate what I’m feeling. Because if you hold back instead of just being honest, eventually it’s going to come out in some other way. So the best practice is just to be vulnerable—it’s never really worth it to try to be tough.”

Another track demonstrating the sheer power of Millsap’s artistic impulse, “Dammit” began as a complex and slow-paced ballad, then evolved into a kinetic two-chord anthem (thanks in part to a failed attempt at creating a U2-like number, as per Agnello’s suggestion). One of the album’s most majestic moments, “Dammit” unfolds as an unlikely epic that perfectly captures the nuances of existential frustration (“It’s hard to be a dancer, baby, when you’re living in your head”) while working up a furious momentum that’s nothing less than exhilarating.

Although Be Here Instead often finds Millsap wandering into new terrain, the album remains firmly grounded in the sophisticated musicianship he began honing as a kid growing up in the small town of Purcell. Raised on Texas singer/songwriters like Townes Van Zandt, he started writing songs on acoustic guitar in his early teens, then made his debut at the age of 19 with the 2012 album Palisade. With his self-titled sophomore effort arriving in 2014, Millsap released both The Very Last Day and Other Arrangements to widespread praise, with famed rock critic Ann Powers dubbing him a “star in the making” and Rolling Stone stating that the latter album “mingle[s] the sacred and profane to rollicking effect.” Through the years, he’s also made his name as a captivating live act, opening for the likes of Jason Isbell, Patty Griffin, and Lucinda Williams and taking the stage at major festivals like Bonnaroo, Austin City Limits, and Newport Folk Fest. And in a particularly memorable turn of events, Millsap joined singer/songwriter Sarah Jarosz for a 2016 show in Atlanta and drew raves from none other than Sir Elton John, who hailed the performance as “one of the best concerts I have ever seen” and noted that the night “restored my faith in music.”

In looking back on the making of Be Here Instead, Millsap points out that his recently discovered love of painting also informed the free-flowing creativity he brought to the album. “My wife’s grandfather was an artist who did watercolor paintings, and a few years ago I decided I wanted to try it,” he says. “I very quickly found out that watercolors are really hard to work with: you have to embrace your mistakes, and then let them guide you along. It’s made me think about how when you mess up, you’re basically revealing your humanity, which is what music’s all about. When I listen to records, I love when Ray Charles’s voice cracks, or when you hear the squeaking of the kick-drum pedal on a Led Zeppelin song. Anything that shows the living, breathing quality of the whole thing—that’s always wonderful. That’s what we’re here for. So don’t be afraid to let it happen.”

 

Midnight North

Midnight North

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request.  Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.


ABOUT MIDNIGHT NORTH

There’s Always a Story represents a new chapter for Midnight North. Ten stories told through song on their most polished album to date.Reflecting on the time since their origin, Midnight North is ready to tell the world its story. A group of multi-instrumentalists with songwriting roots in Folk and Americana, Midnight North is a mainstay on the stages of the national touring circuit. Rolling Stone hailed Midnight North as the “Best New Act” in its review of 2018’s Peach Music Festival saying the band “takes the best parts of roots music and weaves them into a tapestry of rock and Americana.”Grahame LeshElliott Peck, & Connor O’Sullivan began playing together in San Francisco. In early 2012 they played their first show as Grahame Lesh & Friends. Grahame & Elliott both brought a repertoire of original music to this new project that was a perfect marriage once the band began performing in earnest. In late 2012 the band went into the studio for the first time, tracking the entirety of their debut album End of the Night in just 2 days. End of the Night (mixed & produced by Connor) was released in June 2013 as they officially debuted the name Midnight North.

The band began touring in June 2015, with the release of their second album Scarlet Skies. That began a five year run as a touring band, playing in 36 states in front of thousands of people across the country. They released Under the Lights, their most successful studio album to date, in summer 2017. “Across all of the tracks, when you think you have the band pegged for a style or a genre, all of a sudden a chorus, or a new solo or new instrument altogether, diverts the music boldly but smartly to a new sound and feel,” said The Poke Around in their review of Under the Lights. They also released two live albums including 2018’s Selections From the Great American Music Hall which featured Bob Weir & Phil Lesh of the Grateful Dead plus members of Twiddle as special guests.

A pivotal moment for the band came when Grahame met drummer Nathan Graham at a benefit show in Philadelphia in 2016. A month later Nathan sat in with the band for a show, eventually joining the band for their longest tour to date in the Spring of 2017. Bringing on the well seasoned drummer as a full-time member of the band (and learning about his banjo playing, singing, and song-writing skills) represented the next step forward as plans were made to record their fourth studio album.

In January 2020, the band went into a California studio with producer David Simon-Baker to craft their fourth studio album, There’s Always a Story, released in 2021 on Americana Vibes. As the world shut down in March and the band quarantined separately around the country, the album was finished remotely in California and Pennsylvania. As the months ticked by they let the rest of the newly written & recorded songs sink into their consciousness so that when work resumed on the album in June the entire album became even better than they could have hoped.

2022 and beyond is a new beginning, and while Midnight North longingly looks ahead, hand-in-hand with the rest of the world, There’s Always a Story will serve as a collective and reflective narrative.

This show is supported by WIJAM
www.wijam.net/
The Collection

The Collection

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request. Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.


ABOUT THE COLLECTION

“Won’t Stop Yet” is an honest, sticky pop song about trying to survive what often feels like the end of the world. About the song, lead singer David Wimbish said, “It’s my version of an empowering anthem – I want so badly to believe we’ll ‘get through this,’ but it doesn’t often feel true…so, for now, it’s one-foot-in-front-of-the-other choruses and hopeful melodies.”

The song popped into David’s head while seasick on tour at the Rock Boat cruise en route to Jamacia. Wimbish laughs about the juxtaposition of joy and sickness – and how it laid the perfect foundation for the song. “I was nauseated and curled up in the fetal position, and drawing beats and whispering, ‘might not make it further, but I won’t stop yet.’ I finished the lyrics a month later, on New Years Eve, processing entering another year of Covid, shutdowns and generally feeling exhausted. All this is going on, and yet there’s something about a new year that is supposed to inspire and keep us going.”

Just before hitting the studio to record, Wimbish threw a snippet of the demo online and the clip + song went viral. “It was pretty overwhelming and great to be honest – we saw a 400% jump in streaming, new followers and fan activity in just a week’s time. I think everyone was just relating to that feeling of exhaustion, reflecting and looking what this next year is going to be. It was great to see it viewed, shared and discovered by so many new fans.”

The Deslondes

The Deslondes

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request. Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.


ABOUT DESLONDES

We shed old skin in order to evolve and move forward. We let go of who we were in the past and embrace who we’re meant to be now. The Deslondes have taken such steps as not only bandmates, but as brothers. The New Orleans quintet—Dan Cutler, Sam Doores, Riley Downing, Cameron Snyder, and John James Tourville—have weathered ups, downs, and everything in
between only to strengthen the bond between them.

Infusing everything from saxophone, flute, and synth to string arrangements and a full drum kit for the first time, the group naturally progress and evolve in real-time on their third full-length offering, Ways & Means [New West Records]. “The title reminds me of being young, getting into the music business, going through everything, and coming out of it,” Riley observes. “We’re taking a look right, left, and back at ourselves.”

“We were letting go of a bunch of old dynamics that left us burnt out,” adds John James. “However, we’re focused on being productive and on the other side.”

The “other side” might just be their brightest yet. The Deslondes revealed their self-titled debut to widespread tastemaker applause during 2015. However, they really hit their stride on Hurry Home in 2017. Right out of the gate, Noisey proclaimed, “The Deslondes have found a comfortable sound to create art in, and it serves them well,” while Rolling Stone noted, “The Deslondes’ take on country relies on a gritty, grimy mix of early rock ‘n’ roll and lo-fi R&B.” In addition to praise from American Songwriter, Paste, The Boot, and more, the record closed out the year on Uncut’s “Favorite Albums of 2017.”

Then, the musicians opted to quietly take a break. In the meantime, Sam shared his self-titled debut as Riley also served up his solo album, Start It Over. Maybe it was something in the air, but 2021 seemed like the perfect moment for the boys to pick up where they left off. “I reached out to everybody individually,” recalls John James. “Dan’s got kids, and I’ve got kids. We’d been touring for a long time. Once I called, it seemed like everyone was really into it. We were excited about doing it again.”

“I was in Lawrence, KS visiting my folks at the height of the Pandemic,” Sam remembers. “I was walking down Massachusetts Avenue on a Sunday morning and wondering what I had left to give the world. Perhaps, I was experiencing a mild existential crisis from living off unemployment and facing the cancellation of my album release tours. Luckily, my phone rang. John James asked how I’d feel about making another Deslondes record with so much genuine enthusiasm it was contagious. We all owe it to him. Instinctually, a resounding ‘Hell Yes’ came out of my mouth.”

Missing the camaraderie, the guys congregated at old haunt The Tigermen Den. Together, they worked out the songs before they entered the Bomb Shelter with longtime producer Andrija Tokic. This time around, members brought in a host of ideas and agreed upon the process before recording.

“We came to some personal agreements about how everything was going to go down in advance,” Dan elaborates. “From experience, we realized what we liked and who was good at what. In terms of the studio, it was probably the easiest album we’ve ever made. Usually, we’re too busy touring to put a lot of thought into pre-production and ideas. This was definitely the most prepared we’ve ever been beforehand.”

The preparation shines on the likes of the first single “South Dakota Wild One.” On the track, harmonica wails over acoustic strumming. Simultaneously, Riley’s grizzled and gruff delivery simmers above a slow burning beat punctuated by a soulful lead.

“It’s a nostalgic song about getting into music, traveling, and running into the special people who were around then, but aren’t around now,” notes Riley. Elsewhere, the opener “Good To Go” saunters on airy electric piano towards a heavenly and hummable saxophone solo.

“If ‘South Dakota Wild One’ was the beginning of traveling and playing music, ‘Good To Go’ is where we’re at now,” Riley continues. “We’re still out here. We’re still good to go. The songs bookend each other.”

Then, there’s “Dunes.” A twang-y riff underscores a fifties-style melody as guitar echoes. “It’s about the arc of a love affair—a relationship that went wrong eventually,” Dan says. “It explores
the symmetry of a relationship and how things come full circle in our life.”

The dreamy “Five Year Plan” nods to Harry Nilsson with its dusty bliss, plinking keys, and cinematic orchestration. Album closer “Hero” takes flight on soaring slide guitar and wistful vocal delivery.

“I grew up in a real tight-knit family in the country,” Riley goes in. “We all pitched in to take care of my grandmother at the end of her life. We’re our own heroes to our families and friends. I needed to write the song to remind myself you can be your own hero. If it helps me, maybe it will help someone else.”

In the end, The Deslondes draw on their own familial union to forge a similar connection with listeners.

“To us, this is family,” John James leaves off. “It’s a part of our lives. When you hear our music, I hope you feel like you’re hanging out with us. The band’s back together now, and it just feels good.”

“Riley, JJ, Dan, and Cam are my brothers,” Sam concurs. “We’ve all been through so much together. I don’t think any of us will have that experience with another group of people again in our lives. Sometimes, we drive each other crazy of course, but we’re family. I’d take a bullet for any of those geezers.”

Finding North Album Release

Finding North Album Release

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request. Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.

Wu Grass: Chris Castino & Chicken Wire Empire

Wu Grass: Chris Castino & Chicken Wire Empire

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request.  Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.


Chris Castino & Chicken Wire Empire Independently Release Fresh Pickles

A Star-Studded Bluegrass Restyling of Castino’s Music with The Big Wu

Featuring guest appearances by

Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, Andy Hall, Peter Rowan, Keller Williams,
Tim O’Brien, Nick Forster, Vince Herman, and Album Co-Producer Adam Greuel

 St. Paul, Minn. —You could say that Chris Castino is a writer of dance music. Not the kind you hear at any club. It’s the kind you hear at a Dead show, or festivals, when the crowd moves together spinning and bouncing like an ocean of blissful and emancipated souls. Chris is the primary songwriter for his longtime popular Minnesota-based rock’n’roll jamband The Big Wu. The Big Wu started in the mid 90’s and quickly ascended from the comforts of the local club scene to playing H.O.R.D.E Fest, Bonnaroo, Gathering of the Vibes, High Sierra, and the list goes on.

With the incredibly talented band Chicken Wire Empire from Milwaukee, WI, Chris and the boys took the opportunity, while sitting through COVID-19 lock-downs in 2020 and 2021, to arrange some of his catalog into impeccably fitting bluegrass tunes. These songs were transformed and the resulting album, Fresh Pickles, sounds instantly familiar. What the listener will hear is an album that feels like a classic bluegrass album—it is a light-hearted, down-home concept that plays with the idea that although some of the songs were written many years before, they now feel brand new. Fresh.

Chris is a natural; in his singing style, writing, and producing. Fresh Pickles is just the beginning of a heartfelt and fulfilling voyage into bluegrass— it features stomping rippers and sweet, harmonic ballads, as well as a taste of genre-shifting psychedelic rides. Always true to the tradition and authentic in presentation, Fresh Pickles is packed with great music and will be independently released on February 4.

This joyous album making process produced many special guest appearances from several GRAMMY winning artists in the bluegrass and Americana world including Sam Bush, Peter Rowan, Tim O’Brien, Jerry Douglas, Andy Hall, Vince Herman, Nick Forster, Keller Williams, and Adam Greuel.

Chris says, “What turned out to be just something to occupy our time while we weren’t touring, became something outstanding. I am driven to make music that is lasting and accessible; but my personal style is a combination of sincerity and imagery. There is, to be fair, much more depth in my writing now, having gone through the reckoning of addiction that laid me low, and required nothing short of a rebirth.”

“It brings me joy to hear how these songs in particular have been given new life,” Castino continues,”For music lovers who are unfamiliar with my songs I truly believe that this record will be a fresh experience for them. It’s not essential to understand the history of these songs to appreciate them. My hope is to bring a new audience to my music, so that the next record can reach more people. This is my only desire. And my best tunes are yet to come.” Fresh Pickles follows Castino’s introspective 2020 debut solo album Brazil.

Adam Greuel (Horseshoes and Hand Grenades, The High Hawks) worked with Castino to produce the album, along with adding vocals on a couple of tracks (“Minnesota Moon” and “Jackson County”). Greuel says, “I’ve always heard and felt the influence of bluegrass music on Caz’s songwriting. Lyrically, his content and themes seem to occasionally draw from that tradition, while the music has hints of that bluegrass drive or perhaps the sweetness of a traditional waltz. When Castino gave me a ring and explained that he was interested in breathing some new life into some of his more loved Big Wu classics by way of bluegrass, my initial reaction was raw excitement. Castino is one witty and wild loon. His lyrics tell a vivid story and his chord progressions are often that lovely balance between familiar and boundary-pushing.”

Castino’s early passion for bluegrass music was cultivated by his father, a professional singer of standards, who was captivated by that plaintive, lonesome vocal style. He says, “I learned all he could from the weekly dose of bluegrass served, like some foreign cuisine to the northern city folk of Minneapolis who knew not the traditions of the southern hill folk, by host Phil Nusbaum and his 35+ years long running radio show Bluegrass Saturday Morning on local community radio: to this day.” Captivated, he began to steer his composing down this road.

Greuel says, “Caz got in touch with the fellas from Milwaukee’s Chicken Wire Empire to effectively ‘bluegrassasize’ his tunes. With the songs having already been recorded with Castino’s main band, The Big Wu, there was essentially a road map or launch pad for the tunes to evolve from. CWE are a group of musical masterminds. Their music lands on this wonderful line between tradition and exploration. To me, they were the perfect fit for Caz and his songs. Their talents flow far and wide, both individually and collectively, and their ability as arrangers and bluegrass students and historians led this project into a perfect musical territory where the tradition of bluegrass music was happily melded with the progressive and ever creative songwriting of Chris Castino.”

Fresh Pickles features 11 original songs penned by Castino. All of which, but one, were first released on four of The Big Wu’s five studio albums spanning from 1997-2019. The other song (“The Ballad Of Dan Toe”) appeared on a 2002 “official” live show release from 1998. Fresh Pickles can be seen as a retrospective and reexamination of these songs through a bluegrass lens.

The Ballad Of Dan Toe” is a south-of-the-border inspired tune that The Big Wu has kept in their repertoire since the 90s. Castino says, “It’s a tale of a mythical mystic who is bigger than life. Because it is inspired by the writing of Peter Rowan there’s no understating the bliss of having him sing with me on this tune. Jerry Douglas also appears here. These two are my bigger-than-life heroes.”

Formed in 1992, the Big Wu’s momentum was driven by Castino’s catchy songwriting and the band’s hefty tour schedule in the late 90’s early 00’s, which launched the band into becoming a mainstay in the national roots and jamband scene. In 1997 The Big Wu landed a spot on H.O.R.D.E Fest and that same year they also released their first album, Tracking Buffalo Through The Bathtub, which included the already crowd favorites, “Kangaroo” and “Red Sky.” In fitting format, those are the first two tracks on Fresh Pickles.

The Fresh Pickles album opener, “Kangaroo,” demonstrates how well the songs lend themselves to bluegrass and introduces the core band with Castino on lead vocals and guitar along with Chicken Wire Empire’s Ryan Ogburn on mandolin, Jordan Kroeger on bass, Ernest Brusbardis IV on fiddle, and Jon Peik on banjo. Castino says, “‘Kangaroo’ is one of the very first songs I wrote as a professional. It’s upbeat and irreverent but also reveals the bluegrass influence which was so strong in my writing in those early days.”

An ambitious “Red Sky” recounts a drive home from the Dead shows in 95; the lyrics being sets of images with Sam Bush’s fiddle work here knitting several different movements within the theme together.

A couple of other songs from that era include the buoyant “Shantytown,” a song in which Leftover Salmon’s Vince Herman’s vocals are the perfect fit, if there ever was one, and country-song-turned-funky, “Minnesota Moon” (both released in 2000 by The Big Wu on Folktales).

Having earned a reputation as one of the most actively touring bands around, along with regularly hosting their own festival since 1998 (The Big Wu Family Reunion), by 2002, The Big Wu became the first band to play at Bonnaroo, kicking off the inaugural version of the festival. They also had a new album in hand that year, Spring Reverb, from which two tracks are selected here. Two more pickles in the jar: “Rhode Island Red” (a high speed bluegrass tune since day one) and Fresh Pickles’ closing track “Irregular Heartbeat,” which Chris says, “has a decidedly different feel… Perhaps indicative of what the future might (and certainly could) hold for us. It’s a Thile inspired alternative to the genre. He’s one of my favorite writers.”

The high energy and jolly “Texas Fireball” (originally released on Tool for Evening in 2004), marks the center of Fresh Pickles and sees Keller Williams spit the second verse fast and smooth and The Infamous Stringdusters’ Andy Hall’s Dobro solo is on fire. Keller says, “It’s fun to collaborate with old bros. This direction seems to make sense for Chris. Storytelling and quick picking is right up his alley.”

The Big Wu was a full-time touring commodity for years until they spilled some wind from their sails so they could deal with the changes within their lives including new family dynamics and health. They continue to write and perform a number of select shows and released their most recent studio album, We Are Young, We Are Old, in 2019. A few of those tracks were selected for Fresh Pickles, adding three more pickles to the jar: the travelogue “Bound For the South,” the nostalgic “Young Pioneer,” and the atmospheric song from the road, “Jackson County.”

Tim O’Brien’s harmony fiddle is mournful and resolute in the travelogue Bound For the South,” while Nick Forster [both of Hot Rize] contributes vocals along with Castino. They take you through a journey down Highway 61 from Minnesota to Mississippi.

Castino says, “‘Jackson County’ completely morphed into something remarkable. Originally an epic Floyd-style power ballad about the thin line between real and drug-induced perceived threats, we turn it into a Flatt & Scruggs-Esque uptempo waltz. Maybe it’s Jerry Douglas’ killer licks but I’m certain this is what the song was meant to be. Still epic, and It’s also now a favorite of mine.”

Fresh Pickles highlights some of Chris’s most beloved tunes arranged to manifest and honor his longtime affection for bluegrass music. With the help of many of Chris’s lifelong musical heroes, this record has that classic 70’s and 80’s alt-bluegrass sound, while never too far from the traditional bluegrass style that defines the genre. Fresh Pickles aims to satisfy your cravings.

 

Late Night Hootenanny <br> with The High Hawks

Late Night Hootenanny
with The High Hawks

This event is SOLD OUT!
★ About The High Hawks ★
“The word supergroup gets overused to describe side musical projects, but it’s apt and well-earned when it comes to The High Hawks. With nearly 150 years of collective touring and playing between them, Vince Herman (Leftover Salmon), Tim Carbone (Railroad Earth, Blue Sparks From Hell), Chad Staehly (Hard Working Americans), Adam Greuel (Horseshoes & Hand Grenades), Brian Adams (DeadPhish Orchestra) and Will Trask (Great American Taxi) have maintained a generation-spanning presence at the forefront of the roots music scene for over two decades.”
Read more about The High Hawks here: thehighhawks.com
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Please note that The Sylvee, High Noon Saloon, Majestic Theatre, and Orpheum Theater are requiring all fans to provide proof of full vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of the show. Proof of vaccination includes either an original vaccination card, a copy of your vaccination card, or a picture of your vaccination card that will be matched with your ID. Additional policies may apply on a show-by-show basis. More details available at here.

**POSTPONED** Suzanne Santo

**POSTPONED** Suzanne Santo

Suzanne Santo at High Noon Saloon on Friday, March 11 has been postponed. Your ticket will be honored for the rescheduled date when announced. For any further ticket inquiries please reach out to point of purchase.

 

Please note that High Noon Saloon, Majestic Theatre, Orpheum Theater, and The Sylvee are requiring all fans to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours OR full vaccination for entry to all events at the venue moving forward. Additional policies may apply on a show-by-show basis. More details available here.


ABOUT SUZANNE SANTO

Suzanne Santo has never been afraid to blur the lines. A tireless creator, she’s built her sound in the grey area between Americana, Southern-gothic soul, and forward-thinking rock & roll. It’s a sound that nods to her past — a childhood spent in the Rust Belt; a decade logged as a member of the L.A.-based duo HoneyHoney; the acclaimed solo album, Ruby Red, that launched a new phase of her career in 2017; and the world tour that took her from Greece to Glastonbury as a member of Hozier’s band — while still exploring new territory. With Yard Sale, Santo boldly moves forward, staking her claim once again as an Americana innovator. It’s an album inspired by the past, written by an artist who’s only interested in the here-and-now. And for Suzanne Santo, the here-and-now sounds pretty good.

Yard Sale, her second release as a solo artist, finds Santo in transition. She began writing the album while touring the globe with Hozier — a gig that utilized her strengths not only as a vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, but as a road warrior, too. “We never stopped,” she says of the year-long trek, which often found her pulling double-duty as Hozier’s opening act and bandmate. “Looking back, I can recognize how much of a game-changer it was. It raised my musicianship to a new level. It truly reshaped my career.”

Songs like “Fall For That” were written between band rehearsals, with Santo holing herself up in a farmhouse on the rural Irish coast. Others were finished during bus rides, backstage writing sessions, and hotel stays. Grateful for the experience but eager to return to her solo career, she finished her run with Hozier, joining the band for one final gig — a milestone performance at Glastonbury, with 60,000 fans watching — before flying home to Los Angeles. Within three days, she was back in the studio, working with producer John Spiker on the most compelling album of her career.

Santo didn’t remain in Los Angeles for very long. Things had changed since she released 2017’s Ruby Red, an album produced by Butch Walker and hailed by Rolling Stone for its “expansion of her Americana roots.” She’d split up with her longtime partner. Her old band, HoneyHoney, was on hiatus. Feeling lonely in her own home, Santo infused songs like “Common Sense” and “Idiot” with achingly gorgeous melodies and woozy melancholia. She then got the hell out, moving to Austin — a city whose fingerprints are all over Yard Sale, thanks to appearances by hometown heroes like Shakey Graves and Gary Clark Jr. — and falling in love all over again. Throughout it all, Santo continued writing songs, filling Yard Sale with the ups and downs of a life largely spent on the run.

“I moved so much, both emotionally and physically, while making this record,” she says. “I dropped my band, joined a world tour, came back home, went through a heartbreak, moved across the country, and fell in love with someone else. I just kept marching forward. Throughout that experience, there was this emotional unpacking of sorts. A shedding of baggage. I’ve gotten good at knowing what I need to keep holding onto and what I don’t.”

If yard sales represent a homeowner’s purging of old possessions in order to clear up some much-needed room, then Yard Sale marks the moment where Suzanne Santo makes peace with her past and embraces a better, bolder present. Musically, she’s at the top of her game, writing her own string arrangements and singing each song an agile, acrobatic voice. On “Since I’ve Had Your Love,” she bridges the gap between indie-rock and neo-soul, punctuating the song’s middle stretch with a cinematic violin solo. She mixes gospel influences with a deconstructed R&B beat on “Over and Over Again,” recounts some hard-learned lessons with the folk-rock anthem “Mercy,” and drapes “Bad Beast” with layers of spacey, atmospheric electric guitar. Shakey Graves contributes to “Afraid of Heights,” a rainy-day ballad driven forward by a metronomic drum pattern, and Gary Clark Jr. punctuates the guitar-driven “Fall For That” with fiery fretwork.

“This is like one of those yard sales where there’s something for everybody,” Santo says. “You want a crockpot or a racquetball paddle? A duvet cover? I’ve got it.” On a more serious note, she adds, “But I’ve also gotten into the emotional concept of what a yard sale really is, too. This record is about the things I’ve left behind and the things I’ve holding onto. I was broken up with while writing the record. I fell in love again while writing the record. And I learned to fearlessly follow my gut, in all places of my life, while making this record.”

You can’t blame Suzanne Santo from looking back once in awhile. Raised in Parma, OH, she was scouted as a model and actress at 14 years old, spent her summer vacations working in locations like Tokyo, and later moved to New York City, where she attended the Professional Children’s School alongside classmates like Jack Antonoff and Scarlett Johansson. Moving to Los Angeles in her late teens, she formed HoneyHoney and released three albums with the duo, working with top-shelf Americana labels like Lost Highway and Rounder Records along the way. Working with Butch Walker on 2017’s Ruby Red resulted in an offer to join Walker’s touring band, followed one year later by a similar request from Hozier.

“It’s a rollercoaster, and I’ve been strapped in pretty good,” she says. “I’ve been riding it out.”

Arts Fishing Club x Virginia Man

Arts Fishing Club x Virginia Man

Please note that High Noon Saloon, Majestic Theatre, Orpheum Theater, and The Sylvee are requiring all fans to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours OR full vaccination for entry to all events at the venue moving forward. Additional policies may apply on a show-by-show basis. More details available here.

Doors at 8:00 pm | Show at 8:30 pm

Ages 18+ All tickets are standing General Admission and are available on a first come first serve basis. Advance tickets can be purchased online or at The Sylvee box office. Once the doors have opened, if tickets are still available, they can be purchased at the High Noon Saloon.

Cactus Blossoms

Cactus Blossoms

Please note Cactus Bottoms is requiring all fans to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours OR full COVID-19 vaccination for entry.  
 

Doors at 7:00 pm | Show at 8:00 pm All tickets are standing General Admission and are available on a first come first serve basis.

ABOUT CACTUS BLOSSOMS

“Hey baby, do you wanna take a trip with me? / I’ve got a feeling there might be a silver lining all around.” So begins One Day, the captivating new album from critically acclaimed Minneapolis duo The Cactus Blossoms. Written and recorded during the COVID-19 pandemic, the record explores the tension between optimism and despair that’s defined much of the past few years of American life, examining the power (or naïveté, depending on your perspective) of positive thinking in the face of chaos and uncertainty. The songs here are tender and timeless, with straightforward arrangements centered around brothers Jack Torrey and Page Burkum’s airtight harmonies, and the performances are warm and intimate to match, delivered with a soulful, ’70s-inspired palette of playful Wurlitzer, breezy guitars, and muscular percussion.

The Cactus Blossoms broke out nationally in 2016 with their JD McPherson-produced debut, You’re Dreaming. Dates with Kacey Musgraves, Jenny Lewis, and Lucius followed, as did raves from the New York Times and NPR, who praised “the brothers’ extraordinary singing.” The band was further catapulted into the spotlight in 2018, when David Lynch tapped them to perform in the return of Twin Peaks, and continued to build on their success with their 2019 sophomore LP, Easy Way, which led Rolling Stone to laud the duo’s “rock-solid, freak of genetics harmonies.”