Genre: Country

Breese Stevens Pre Party

Breese Stevens Pre Party

 

BAG POLICY

Bags (max size 12″ x 6″ x 12″) are allowed and will be searched upon entry. Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers. We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Dale Watson and His Lone Stars

Dale Watson and His Lone Stars

 

BAG POLICY

Bags (max size 12″ x 6″ x 12″) are allowed and will be searched upon entry. Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers. We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Dale has flown the flag for classic honky-tonk for over two decades. He’s christened his brand of American roots “Ameripolitan” to differentiate it from current crop of Nashville-based pop country. The Alabama-born, Texas-raised Watson may be the hardest working entertainer today and is rapidly approaching legendary status. He is a country music maverick, a true outlaw who stands alongside Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, and George Strait as one of the finest country singers and songwriters from the Lone Star State.

Blue County Pistol, Dusk, TS Foss, & Tommy Goodroad

Blue County Pistol, Dusk, TS Foss, & Tommy Goodroad

 

BAG POLICY

Bags (max size 12″ x 6″ x 12″) are allowed and will be searched upon entry. Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers. We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Hillbilly Casino + Sasquatch & The Sick-A-Billys

Hillbilly Casino + Sasquatch & The Sick-A-Billys

 

BAG POLICY

Bags (max size 12″ x 6″ x 12″) are allowed and will be searched upon entry. Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers. We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Hillbilly Casino

In a town known for ‘hat act’ pop country, and slick production, the Hillbilly Casino has been working hard. Since 2005, the band has been an anchor of Nashville’s underground roots music community. Booking their own local shows, and touring across the US and Europe with acts as diverse as Brian Setzer, Rancid and Yelawolf, and releasing their own records, The Hillbilly Casino took the best of the DYI ethic from the punk scene, and applied it to their very own brand of real american music.

Drawing inspiration from early rock and roll and blues, to punk, metal and everything inbetween, these four have created a sound and attitude that is unforgettable. Featuring former members of Brian Setzer’s Nashvillains, BR549, and the Blue Moon Boys, The Hillbilly Casino has a roots pedigree that comes through in their writing and playing, and a live show that has blown away audiences from all over the world.

Sasquatch & the Sick-A-Billys

Serious songwriting from YEARS of hardship, road experience and inner turmoil. The way it was supposed to be, but with a new approach.

Over 10 years of relentless touring has cemented SASQUATCH as one of the most high gear, powerhouse band leaders around… his bands, The Sick-a-Billys, Holy Hellraisers, Full Moon Boys and his critically acclaimed King Sickabilly “One Man Band” have all stayed true as far as vocals, lyrics and his fiery guitar-work. Never giving up his song-writing mission… keeping real music alive and dangerous in the under-underground. Risen from a not so forgotten past, when Live Music still meant something and the scene wasn’t a Pre-Apocalyptic Ghost Town… bloody fingertips and a soul-haunting voice will deliver you songs about Sin, Love, Murder, Tornadoes and drinking until you wake up under a random barstool.

SASQUATCH!

David J<br>Commitment Issues Tour

David J
Commitment Issues Tour

 

BAG POLICY

Bags (max size 12″ x 6″ x 12″) are allowed and will be searched upon entry. Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers. We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Despite being only 20 years old, David J has been singing, songwriting and performing for nearly a decade. When he was a kid growing up in Rotterdam, New York, he had aspirations of joining the NFL and was quarterback at his sports-focused schools. But another teenage phenom inspired a swift, decisive shift in passion: Justin Bieber’s documentary concert film “Never Say Never.”

“It looked a lot cooler than what I was doing, all the girls chasing him,” David says with a laugh. But it was more than just the adoring fans and slick sets that drew him in. “Watching how he could bring a team together into what he does, and the shows looked like so much fun. So, I quit sports and learned how to sing and play guitar in my bedroom.”

For the most part, David kept his new interest in music secret, hesitant to let his school friends know he spent his spare time teaching himself how to create music. But small clues started to appear. Where he used to get kicked out of choir class for refusing to sing, he soon started catching the ears and attention of his peers. People started to notice his potential, whether it was a substitute teacher hearing him messing around in class, his mom watching him during a karaoke night, friends catching him post a cryptic video on Snapchat. They all said the same thing – “you’ve got something here.”

With every bit of feedback, David was more invigorated to strengthen his natural gifts. He started working what could be considered the northeastern version of the honky-tonk circuit – entering singing competitions in local fairs, hitting open mic nights and impressing club owners so much they’d invite him to play weekly happy hours. As time went on, he would draw such a strong crowd they offered him longer nighttime gigs, and eventually weekend headline slots. Local radio stations made him a standard opener for just about any show that came through the area, leading David to support the likes of Blake Shelton and Chase Rice, among others.

He booked upwards of 150 shows a year. When he opened for Mitchell Tenpenny in 2018, Tenpenny told him Nashville was the spot for anyone looking to be a country singer and songwriter. David started reaching out to Nashville-based songwriters via social media, collaborating virtually from Upstate, even in pre-COVID times. David began working on developing his sound and consistently writing in Nashville shortly after he started working with his team at Grey Area Music in early 2021. By September of that year “Lost My Heartbreak” found a breakthrough, with other releases, “Before You,” and “What Goes Around” connecting with audiences as well.

David assembling a team behind the scenes, and in late 2022 a friend brought in a longtime fan of David’s: OneRepublic frontman (and one of David’s musical heroes) Ryan Tedder into the conversation. “I didn’t know Ryan was following my development all this time. I might have tried a bit harder” he jokes. “When things were at the stage of getting a major label involved, Ryan said ‘we’d love to be a part of it.’ Now we talk on the daily.”

Now, with Grey Area Music, Sony Music Nashville, and Tedder’s Runner Music in his corner, David is primed to blow the country-pop landscape wide open. With influences ranging from Kane Brown and Sam Hunt to Bieber and Drake, he walks the fine line of country lyricism over a bed of pop-laced sonics. But his voice cuts through, emotive and mature far beyond his age. “When I grew up, I wanted to do everything. If I wasn’t good at something, I wanted to get to be the best I could at it. Now, it’s about getting the biggest and best songs to put out, to start touring. I wanna be global. That’s my plan and goal.”

[SOLD OUT] Dylan Marlowe<br>Dirt Road When I Die Tour

[SOLD OUT] Dylan Marlowe
Dirt Road When I Die Tour

 

BAG POLICY

Bags (max size 12″ x 6″ x 12″) are allowed and will be searched upon entry. Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers. We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Dylan Marlowe

Statesboro, Georgia native Dylan Marlowe is Nashville’s newest rising star on the country music scene, where he comes likely wearing camouflage and an audible smile, equipped with a sound that blends traditional country themes with a touch of rock. Dylan was named as one of Spotify’s Hot Country Artists to Watch for 2023 and now has an exciting year of firsts under his belt, with promise to make an even bigger splash in 2024. Marlowe got to celebrate his first No. 1 as a songwriter with Jon Pardi’s “Last Night Lonely,” he made his Grand Ole Opry debut, got married, and released his debut EP, Dirt Road When I Die. Billboard noted that the project “ranges from banjo-flecked country to headbanger tones with tight, edgy harmonies certifying his country roots.” Dirt Road When I Die features the soaring title track plus “You Were Right (Nat’s Song),” which Dylan released as a surprise for his now-wife on their wedding day in May. Country Now lauded his “raw, consoling vocals” on the song, noting that the “elegant piano melody takes the ballad to new heights.” Another buzzworthy song on the project, “Record High,” was praised by MusicRow as “Moody and haunting. The soundscape ripples with dobro, muted percussion and chimed electronics. His broken-hearted delivery aches with sincerity. Excellent work.” In addition to the EP, Dylan was featured on Avery Anna’s “I Will (When You Do)” and Kasey Tyndall’s “Place For Me,” and in October he released his new collab with Dylan Scott, “Boys Back Home.” The song received over 3.2 million global streams in its first week.

The singer has spent the fall opening for HARDY’s the mockingbird and THE CROW FALL TOUR along with Lainey Wilson. He has also toured with Jordan Davis, Morgan Wallen and Scotty McCreery this year. Dylan recently announced his headlining DIRT ROAD WHEN I DIE TOUR for 2024, which will kick off in February. With over half a million followers on social media, the singer continues to grow his fan base each day with his captivating live performance and his heartfelt, hooky lyrics.

Mackenzie Carpenter

Hailing from the small town of Hull, GA, Mackenzie Carpenter is the spunky blonde girl-next-door that fell in love with music as a kid, writing alongside her brothers and singing in church. Years later, the outspoken singer-songwriter is breaking the mold for small-town women by writing and singing her truth, armed with the knowledge that everyone has a little bit of “hot mess” in them, no matter how shiny the book cover may seem. With an upbringing consisting of a rowdy support system, back porch hootenannies and juicy drama, the affable and kind Carpenter also embraces the crazy and “tacky” aspects that make life more interesting. Fans are loving SiriusXM Highway find, “Can’t Nobody,” TikTok viral, “Huntin’ Season,” vulnerable “Jesus I’m Jealous” and her latest girl’s girl anthem, “Don’t Mess With Exes.” New tune “Throw You Back” was also thrown into the mix on the artist’s self-titled debut EP, putting her cheeky yet nuanced songwriting ability on full display across the five songs. Carpenter most recently channeled her inner Cyndi Lauper, adding just enough country twang to an ‘80s classic in “Country Girls (Just Wanna Have Fun).” Since signing her first record deal with The Valory Music Co. in 2022, Mackenzie has been named to Spotify’s Hot Country 2024 Artists To Watch, CMT’s Next Women of Country class of 2023, Nashville Briefing’s Artists To Watch 2023 and many more spotlight programs. She recently wrapped the THE LUCKY TOUR with her “I’m Not Pretty” co-writer and friend, Megan Moroney and plans to hit the road with Cole Swindell on the WIN THE NIGHT TOUR and Dylan Marlowe on the DIRT ROAD WHEN I DIE TOUR for select dates this spring. The rising star made her Grand Ole Opry debut in June and has already opened for talents like Miranda Lambert, Jake Owen, Parker McCollum, Craig Campbell and Ryan Hurd. Last year, Carpenter took the stage at major events like CMA Fest, Country Thunder, Tortuga Music Festival, Stagecoach. Visit mackenziecarpentermusic.com for more information.

Wayne Hancock

Wayne Hancock

 

BAG POLICY

Bags (max size 12″ x 6″ x 12″) are allowed and will be searched upon entry. Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers. We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Alternative country favorite Wayne Hancock is that rare breed of traditionalist: one who imbues his retro obsessions with such high energy and passion that his songs never feel like museum pieces he’s trying desperately to preserve. Hancock is most often compared to Hank Williams , and he can indeed be a hardcore honky tonker, but there’s more to him than that: he also displays a genuine affinity for stomping rockabilly, Western swing, blues, and old-timey country à la Jimmie Rodgers . Plus, he also throws in the occasional pop standard in the manner of Willie Nelson ‘s classic Stardust album. Hancock’s devotion to classic country sounds, coupled with his strong aversion to the Nashville hit-making machine, earned him an ardent following among alternative country fans (from both the country and rock sides of the movement), as well as a fair amount of critical acclaim.

Wayne “The Train” Hancock was born May 1, 1965, and began writing songs around age 12. His family moved around a lot during his childhood, and often sang to entertain themselves. Hancock started playing juke joints around Texas as a teenager, and at age 18 won a prestigious talent competition, the Wrangler Country Showdown; however, he was unable to reap the benefits, having just enlisted in the Marines. After six years in the military, Hancock returned to Texas and began playing around the state wherever he could, working odd jobs on the side to help make ends meet. Eventually tiring of his itinerant existence, Hancock moved to West Dallas in 1993, and shortly thereafter settled in the music mecca of Austin. In 1994, he got a part in the musical theater production Chippy, where he performed alongside progressive country legends Joe Ely , Butch Hancock (no relation), Robert Earl Keen , and Terry Allen . He also made his recorded debut on the soundtrack album Songs from Chippy.

Thanks to that bit of exposure, Hancock was able to score a deal with the small Texas indie label Deja Disc . His debut album, Thunderstorms and Neon Signs, was produced by steel guitar legend Lloyd Maines and released in 1995. Critics fawned over the album, particularly the Hank Williams -ish title track, and despite being on a tiny label with limited distribution, it sold over 20,000 copies, mostly through word of mouth. Its success attracted the attention of the somewhat larger indie Ark 21 , which signed Hancock for his second album, That’s What Daddy Wants. Issued in 1997, the record found Hancock employing elaborate, horn-driven arrangements and delving more deeply into rockabilly and Western swing, which earned some comparisons to the Brian Setzer Orchestra . Reviews were again highly positive, and Ark 21 accordingly reissued Hancock’s debut. His third album, Wild, Free & Reckless, had more traditional country instrumentation, full of fiddles and steel guitars, and accordingly was more reminiscent of pre-rock & roll country boogie.

Hancock subsequently switched to the alt-country hub Bloodshot Records , debuting in 2001 with A-Town Blues, which continued the more stripped-down approach of his most recent music. That same year he released the limited-edition EP South Austin Sessions. Hancock dug even deeper into his honky tonk roots with his next album, 2003’s Swing Time, recorded live during a two-night stand at the Continental Club in Austin. In 2006, Hancock turned in Tulsa, his third full-length recording for Bloodshot , with Lloyd Maines remaining in the producer’s chair. A fourth album for the label, Viper of Melody, appeared in 2009. His next release, Ride, showed up early in 2013, again from Bloodshot . In April 2014, Hancock was involved in a serious motorcycle accident, which left him with a fractured elbow and a collapsed lung. He was forced to cancel several months’ worth of tour dates due to the wreck, but by the end of the year he was fully recovered and back on the road. In 2016, Hancock returned to the studio with producer Lloyd Maines to cut his eighth studio album Slingin’ Rhythm.

A Thousand Horses

A Thousand Horses

 

BAG POLICY

Bags (max size 12″ x 6″ x 12″) are allowed and will be searched upon entry. Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers. We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Back in the summer of 2021, the members of Nashville-based band A Thousand Horses headed to a farmhouse in Texas and spent three days writing songs on the front porch with no real agenda. “Over the past few years we’ve all gone through a lot of change in our lives, and we’d gotten to a place where the band felt very splintered and there was so much uncertainty in the air,” recalls guitarist Bill Satcher, who co-founded A Thousand Horses with frontman Michael Hobby, bassist Graham DeLoach, and former guitarist Zach Brown. “We decided to take a weekend to isolate ourselves, and refocus on why we started doing this in the first place.” Inspired by the untamed beauty of their surroundings—a 300-acre creekside ranch overrun with wildflowers and 100-year-old oak trees, the Milky Way shining bright in the night sky—A Thousand Horses soon came up with a wildly life-affirming song called “Highway Sound”: a soul-soothing track that instantly set the tone for their new album The Outside.

“As soon as we wrote ‘Highway Sound,’ it felt like a sign from the universe that we needed to keep going,” says Hobby. “It had that same feeling as when we first started playing music together back when we were kids, and became the focal point for an album that’s all about finding your freedom despite the many forces in life that try to hold you down.”

The third full-length from A Thousand Horses, The Outside finds the band working with Grammy Award-winning producer Jon Randall (Dierks Bentley, Miranda Lambert, Parker McCollum) and delving deeper into the freewheeling originality they’ve embraced since their Dave Cobb-produced debut Southernality (a 2015 release featuring their platinum-certified, chart-topping single “Smoke”). In bringing the LP to life, A Thousand Horses mainly recorded at Sound Emporium and Blackbird Studio in Nashville, slowly carving out a one-of-a-kind sound merging elements of Southern Rock, Classic Country, and hard-driving Americana. “There was no deadline or pressure from a label, but at the same time we felt more focused and determined than we ever had before—it was the perfect creative storm,” Satcher says. “Making this record felt like therapy, but it was also so much fun,” adds Hobby. “There were days when we’d look up at the clock and realize we’d been at the studio 16 hours, and we couldn’t wait to go back in the next day. We needed that time and space to do what felt good to us, and not let anything dilute our true creative nature.”

When it came time to name their new album, Thousand Horses chose a title that reflected that newly heightened self-reliance. “The Outside is a statement of being unapologetically yourself—it’s about being the truest version of who you are, never putting yourself into a box, never falling in line with the current norms or ‘this year’s big thing,’” says DeLoach. “We’re calling this album The Outside in the hopes that people can find self-empowerment in the music: it’s a way to discover your inner fire and use it to light your path. When you live life that way it inspires others to do the same, and the world could use the power of good in it now more than ever. That’s what we want to spread with this album, and The Outside embodies our message.”

The Outside kicks off with the very track that sparked its creation. “‘Highway Sound’ started with the guys playing guitar out on the porch,” Hobby reveals. “I was inside and heard this bad-ass riff, and it hit me right away. Everybody jumped in and we just started rolling—it was as natural as it can get, songwriting-wise.” Opening on the joyful roar of Hobby’s harmonica, “Highway Sound” arrives as a sing-along-ready anthem etched with so many ear-catching details, achieved in part through such unconventional instrumentation as electric sitar and talkbox. “There’s a lyric in ‘Highway Sound’ that says ‘Brand new start, broke in boots/Old baggage left back home,’ which to me really captures the whole spirit of this record,” says Hobby. “It’s about the freedom of cutting ties with the negativity of the past, and putting your energy into celebrating a new beginning.”

A deeply honest unveiling of their dreams and demons and desires, The Outside next launches into the Southern-Rock reverie of “Summer”—a timeless piece of nostalgia-tinged storytelling, adorned with warm Mellotron tones, Satcher’s luminous slide guitar, and a heavenly crescendo of full-band harmonies. “I had this idea to write a song about a girl named Summer and all the unexpected turns that life can take,” says Hobby. “It’s a sad song with a happy feel, and by the end you realize that Summer was the muse of the main character’s life, even though she wasn’t in it for long—everywhere he goes and everywhere he sings, she’s still there in the music he’s playing. I think everybody’s got their own Summer in some special way.”

Over the course of its 12 songs, The Outside sheds light on everything from the thrill of following your own path (on “The Outside,” a powerfully cathartic rock-and-roll anthem) to the sweet relief of finding inner peace (on the gorgeously understated “No News”) to the profound pain of disconnection (on “Strangers,” with heavy-hearted lyrics written by Hobby with Chris Stapleton: “That’s how you find out/You’re really alone/When a room full of strangers/Starts feeling like home”). As the album unfolds, A Thousand Horses match its emotional complexity with an equally intricate and unpredictable sound. “We really wanted to explore in the studio, and Jon was the right producer to guide us through that,” Satcher says. “Our thinking behind everything was, ‘If it seems obvious, let’s do the exact opposite.’” To that end, the unbridled instrumental “Southeastern Stomp” emerged from a late-night burst of pure spontaneity, while the slow-burning “Roll On” morphs into an all-out epic at its sublimely explosive bridge. And on “Over The Counter,” A Thousand Horses deliver a darkly hypnotic track fueled by fantastically gritty outlaw-country grooves. “With ‘Over The Counter’ there was no demo or preconceived idea of what the song should be,” DeLoach points out. “It ended up being one of the most creative moments in the whole process of making the record, where we just got together and made everything up on the fly.”

Closing out with the ethereal “Drift Away,” The Outside fully reflects the band’s lifetime devotion to music. As kids growing up in Newberry, South Carolina, Hobby and Satcher first started playing together in high school and soon joined forces with DeLoach (Satcher’s cousin, originally from Savannah, Georgia). “We knew we wanted to make this happen come hell or high water, and we threw everything we had into it,” says Hobby. “Bill and I moved to Nashville when we were 17 and 18, and Graham followed us as soon as he graduated the next year—he got his diploma, hopped in his car, and drove all the way here.” In recent years, Hobby and Satcher supported each other through such life-changing experiences as becoming fathers and getting sober—a turn of events they consider highly influential on the making of The Outside. “It wasn’t a rock-bottom type of decision; it was more of a conscious choice to be better people, better fathers, better musicians, and to apply a very clear vision to everything we do,” says Hobby. “Because of that, we were able to push ourselves in ways that we never had in the past, and maybe weren’t even capable of doing before now.”

Since completing The Outside, A Thousand Horses have endured another major shift: Brown’s departure from the band in early 2023. “Zach had gotten to the point where he needed to be home with his family, which is all part of the natural progression of life,” says Hobby. “We love him and we miss him, but at the end of the day we want Zach to do what’s best for him.” Not only vital to the band’s sense of brotherhood, that belief in emboldening others to live their truth imbues every song on The Outside. “We want people to find their freedom and find their voice in what we’re saying, so they can stand on their own and be proud of who they are,” says Hobby. “The world needs a little healing these days, and hopefully by telling our stories as honestly as we can, we’ll help bring people to a better understanding of whatever it is they’re going through.”

Dan Lepien, Frank Martin Busch and The Names, & Michael Mikrut Band

Dan Lepien, Frank Martin Busch and The Names, & Michael Mikrut Band

 

BAG POLICY

Bags (max size 12″ x 6″ x 12″) are allowed and will be searched upon entry. Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers. We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Outlaw Night<br>A Tribute to Willie, Waylon, Johnny and the Hanks

Outlaw Night
A Tribute to Willie, Waylon, Johnny and the Hanks

 

BAG POLICY

Bags (max size 12″ x 6″ x 12″) are allowed and will be searched upon entry. Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers. We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.