Genre: Country

Joseph Huber, MK Ultra, and Driveway Thriftdwellers

Joseph Huber, MK Ultra, and Driveway Thriftdwellers

 

COVID-19 POLICY

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request. Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.

BAG POLICY

Small personal clutches / purses / fanny packs (max size 6.5″ x 4.5″ x 1″) or clear plastic / vinyl / PVC bags (max size 12″ x 12″ x 6″) are the only carry-in bags that are allowed.  We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.  Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Joseph Huber

Joseph Huber hails from the state of Wisconsin, and seems to bring forth the varied voices of whatever it may be that lies dormant within either the fertile soil or the callous concrete of that world. It has been said, “You don’t just like Joseph Huber’s music. You feel it’s something that the rest of the world needs to hear, and how criminal it is that it isn’t spreading far and wide.” That sentiment could be related to the fact that the voices which Huber unearths are subtle and take more than a hurried listen to truly absorb. A person who appears reserved and matter-of-fact in everyday speech brings forth songs that are anything but that.

As the singer, songwriter, performer, recorder and producer of all of his own material, Huber has his hands full, but never seems to miss a beat. And his own ‘solo’ material has now certainly surpassed the output of his past efforts, both in volume and substance. As one of the founding member of the .357 String Band–a group that would probably fit better in today’s ‘Americana-saturated’ environment than in the early to middle aughts–he’s gradually honed a sound that seems to fill a very real gap within the still-emerging genre. Having progressed, Huber continues moving onward and upward captivating folks with his sincere and well-crafted songs under his own name along with the impeccable musicianship of his fellow touring partners. Whether it’s irresistible, fiddle-driven, dancing tunes or honest, heart-wrenching “songwriter” songs, Huber’s songs and shows spans the spectrum of ‘Roots’ music while preferring not to stay within the boundaries of any strict genre classification.

His lyricism and introspective writing style has received high acclaim from music enthusiasts looking for a more substantive substitute to much of today’s music. Maintaining a solid touring schedule, playing all throughout both the U.S. and all around Europe, Huber continues to gain positive press, including being listed on L.A. Weekly’s ’10 More Country Artists To Listen To.’ Blue Ridge Outdoor writes, “Songwriters like Townes Van Zandt, Chris Smither, and John Prine can marvel listeners in the simplest of acoustic settings,…From time to time, I stumble upon a new singer/songwriter whose work warrants comparison to the luminaries on this list. …Huber’s songwriting has me comparing him to my favorites above.” He’s had the pleasure of sharing the stage with many artists including Tyler Childers; Hackensaw Boys; Scott H Biram; The Tillers; Possessed By Paul James; Dave Simonett; Robert Earl Keen; Ben Nichols; The Tossers; Charlie Parr; Amy Lavere; Horseshoes & Hand Grenades; Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band; Henhouse Prowlers; Keller Williams, and more…

As of now, Huber has delivered five solo records: ‘Bury Me Where I Fall’ (2010); ‘Tongues Of Fire’ (2012), ‘The Hanging Road’ (2014); and ‘The Suffering Stage’ (2017), ‘Moondog’ (2019) and now 2021 give us ‘The Downtowner’–Huber’s latest effort which rollicks between social and personal spheres while mixing elements of rock and folk music that fans will immediately see as maintaining a solid continuity of sound and attitude with his previous two albums–rollicking between the feelings of freedom and severity, with both wit and earnestness.

MK Ultra

MK Ultra (est. 2021) is a unique collaboration of Ben Miller (Ben Miller Band) and Pat Kay (The Kay Brothers) born out of the great pandemic. You see…here’s what happens when two fellas like this spend too much time in their shops and start playing “I’ll show you mine if you show me yours.” Miller & Kay, both renowned torchbearers for Ozark mountain music tradition heretofore, have basically built themselves some kind of jangle-stomp-time machine. And in it, together, have embarked on a journey exploring hillbilly music from a distant future. Banjos meet Synthesizers… Dulcimers meet Wobble… Strange flashing lights… Unexplained phenomena… These industrious builders of cobbled homemade instruments showcase some of their most bizarre implements & soundscapes. The future of the past is here, and it’s only weird the first time.

Driveway Thriftdwellers

“Emotionally ripe, old school country.” – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

“Like a vintage yard sale that Merle Haggard might have thrown.” Isthmus.

“Rugged, straightforward country songwriting.” Tone Madison.

Vocals, Guitar / Jon Knudson
Pedal Steel, Vocals / Ryan Knudson
Lead Guitar, Vocals / Kyle Rightley
Bass, Vocals / Aaron Collins
Drums, Vocals / Jon Storey

Read Southall Band<br>The Out n About Tour

Read Southall Band
The Out n About Tour

 

COVID-19 POLICY

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request. Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.

BAG POLICY

Small personal clutches / purses / fanny packs (max size 6.5″ x 4.5″ x 1″) or clear plastic / vinyl / PVC bags (max size 12″ x 12″ x 6″) are the only carry-in bags that are allowed.  We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.  Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

A very isolating 2020 needed shifts in musical direction to get to a place where new music, let alone the Read Southall Band’s crowning achievement could even exist. Their third studio album, For the Birds, is ambitious and captures vigorous, rock ‘n’ roll energy with elements of country and southern rock. From classic to contemporary rock, these are songs that could appeal to the disparate fanbases of Gary Stewart, Joe Walsh, Rival Sons, or Chris Cornell.

American Songwriter called For The Birds, “Exploratory… Traversing through uncharted sonic territory” and Raised Rowdy proclaims, “There is a ton of excitement building around Read Southall Band at the moment.” Riff Magazine notes, “Read Southall Band combines the heavy guitars of the late- and post-grunge era with southern rock vocals and a country music sensibility to create a sound outside the expectations of any of those genres by themselves.”

“I don’t think we would be a band without this album,” says frontman Southall. “I think for a while we were just focused on touring, getting out there and we didn’t take care of the music as needed. In a way, we needed that year off the road. We made an album and just worked. We refocused and decided this is what we want to be doing.”

Southall and his bandmates understand that the album’s long gestation and their sonic shifts may take some adjustment for fans. But that excited uncertainty is reflected in the new album’s title. “We came up with For the Birds because it’s been so long and we were worried that nobody’s waiting for us,” says Southall. “So maybe this record is ‘for the birds.’ If you like it, you like it. It is what it is. For us, it’s six individuals making tunes.”

Town Mountain

Town Mountain

 

COVID-19 POLICY

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request. Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.

BAG POLICY

Small personal clutches / purses / fanny packs (max size 6.5″ x 4.5″ x 1″) or clear plastic / vinyl / PVC bags (max size 12″ x 12″ x 6″) are the only carry-in bags that are allowed.  We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.  Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Hailing from Asheville, North Carolina, Town Mountain is the sum of all its vast and intricate influences — this bastion of alt-country rebellion and honky-tonk attitude pushed through the hardscrabble Southern Appalachian lens of its origin.

“For us, it’s all about the interaction between the audience and the band — doing whatever we can onstage to facilitate that two-way street of energy and emotion,” says mandolinist Phil Barker. “Whether it’s a danceable groove or a particular lyric in a song, we’re projecting what we’re going through in our daily lives, and we feel that other people can attest to that, as well — it’s all about making that connection.”

Amid a renewed sense of self is the group’s latest album, Lines in the Levee, a collage of sound and scope running the gamut of the musical spectrum in the same template of freedom and focus found in the round-robin fashion of the musical institution that is The Band — a solidarity also found in the incendiary live shows Town Mountain is now revered for from coast-to-coast, this devil-may-care gang of strings and swagger.

“This is the sound we’ve been working towards since the inception of the band,” says guitarist Robert Greer. “We realized we needed to do what’s best for us. We’re being true to ourselves. It isn’t a departure, it’s an evolution — the gate is wide open right now.”

“We’ve always had such a reverence and respect for those first and second-generation bluegrass bands, and it was that sound that initially inspired all of us to get together,” Barker adds. “And that will always be part of our sound. But, we also need to grow as artists, and as individuals — for us, that means bringing in a wider palette of sonic influences.”

Formed by Greer and banjoist Jesse Langlais over 15 years ago on a ridge high above the Asheville skyline, the sturdy foundation of Town Mountain came into play with the addition of Barker not long into the band’s tenure. From there, the group pulled in fiddle virtuoso Bobby Britt and bassist Zach Smith. And though the road has been long, it’s also been bountiful.

“It’s definitely been a slow climb. But, it’s been a climb nonetheless, where each new opportunity is filled with a sense of gratitude — to be able to make music, to be able to play music with your friends,” Barker says. “And to be able to bring music to the people, and have them want to show up and listen to it? Well, we’re thankful for that every single day.”

Lines in the Levee also marks the band’s debut album release for famed Nashville label, New West Records. Well-known and championed as a fiercely independent act, the members of Town Mountain felt an immediate kinship with the record label — this genuine bond of creative fulfillment and sustained artistic growth to ensure the long game for the ensemble.

“We’ve always wanted to have a relationship with a label that felt right, and New West felt right,” Langlais says. “New West came to some of our shows and the ball started rolling. They knew they wanted to work with us, and we knew we wanted to work with them. New West lets the artist steer the ship and that’s what we were looking for — to have the autonomy to do what we want, but also have a great label behind us.”

Recorded at Ronnie’s Place (part of the Sound Stage Studios) on Music Row in the heart of Nashville, Lines in the Levee is a bona fide workshop in the seamless blend of Americana, country, bluegrass and folk roots — this crossroads of deep influences and cultivated visions each member of Town Mountain brings to the table.

“The studio has been part of Nashville for over 50 years, and there’s a certain mojo that comes from a space like that — you’re literally stepping into history and that history is in
the air when you hit the record button,” Langlais says.

The album also cements the standing of drummer Miles Miller (of Sturgill Simpson musical lore) a creative force of nature, one who throws several more logs of ideas and inspiration onto the fire that burns brightly within the group — onstage and in the studio.

“When we were looking to add percussion to our sound, Miles was the guy we wanted. We’ve been good friends for a long time, and it just seemed like the natural fit to have him join us,” Greer says. “He’s a fantastic drummer who really elevates the music so high. And he truly understands how to bring drums into a string band setting, something not a lot of people can do.”

Lines in the Levee is also a moment in time for Town Mountain to take pause and glance over its shoulder at the road to the here and now. It’s this whirlwind blur of people, places and things that fly by, especially when your hardscrabble existence is spent along that lost highway — bouncing from town to town, show to show, all in an effort to turn long-held dreams into a daily reality.

“Right from the beginning, it’s always been about camaraderie and the creation of something unique, where we haven’t let any of the bumps on the music business road get us down too much,” Langlais says. “And I think we feel really comfortable with where the Town Mountain sound is right now — that’s a damn good feeling.”

Gin, Chocolate & Bottle Rockets<br>“Tribute to the Trio”

Gin, Chocolate & Bottle Rockets
“Tribute to the Trio”

 

COVID-19 POLICY

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request. Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.

BAG POLICY

Small personal clutches / purses / fanny packs (max size 6.5″ x 4.5″ x 1″) or clear plastic / vinyl / PVC bags (max size 12″ x 12″ x 6″) are the only carry-in bags that are allowed.  We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.  Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Gin, Chocolate & Bottle Rockets combines the musical styles of three solo-artists-turned-bandmates, Jennifer Farley, Shawndell Marks and Beth Kille, into a rich blend of tight 3-part harmonies and clever pop-rock songwriting, ranging from edgy to fun. GCBR released their first EP in November of 2014 and took home the 2015, 2017, 2020 and 2021 Madison Area Music Association (MAMA) Award for Ensemble Vocalists of the Year. They were also recognized as runner-up for Madison’s Favorite Rock Band in the 2016 Isthmus poll. Their sophomore album, entitled “Lean” was released on May 31st, 2018, and won Folk/American Album of the Year at the 2019 MAMA Awards.

Gin, Chocolate & Bottle Rockets crafted a tribute to Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harris titled “Legends in Harmony,” that boasts some of these artists’ greatest hits, delivered with GCBR’s signature powerful vocal blend. This 2-set, multimedia show features songs like 9 to 5, You’re No Good, Desperado and Two More Bottles of Wine.

Please visit www.ginchocolateandbottlerockets.com to keep up with the band and learn more about their tour dates.

Outlaw Night<br>A Tribute to Willie, Waylon, Johnny, and the Hanks

Outlaw Night
A Tribute to Willie, Waylon, Johnny, and the Hanks

 

COVID-19 POLICY

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request. Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.

BAG POLICY

Small personal clutches / purses / fanny packs (max size 6.5″ x 4.5″ x 1″) or clear plastic / vinyl / PVC bags (max size 12″ x 12″ x 6″) are the only carry-in bags that are allowed.  We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.  Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Featuring:
Gregg Hall- Guitars and Vocals
Chris Castino (The Big Wu)- Guitar and Vocals
Dan Kimpel- Pedal Steel
Brett Behrens- Drums
Tim Powers- Bass
w/ special guests tba

Gregg Hall has been a cornerstone of the western Wisconsin music scene for nearly half his life. At 41 years old, he’s played on a dozen albums, recorded over 100 songs, and performed countless shows as a sideman, frontman, and solo/duo act.

With his new album, “Echoes in the Treetops,” Hall makes it clear that inside his chest beats the raging heart of a rocker. The seven-song collection has the fire, the effervescence of a debut album, but it’s seasoned with the soul and perspective of a high-mileage road warrior and the wisdom of a one-time party animal who saw the light and found sobriety five years ago.

A member of the Smokin’ Bandits from 2004-13, Hall also has played in the White Iron Band since 2009 and toured with Nicholas David from 2014-17.

In 2013, he formed Gregg Hall and the Wrecking Ball, recording three albums of his take on outlaw country backed by top-flight La Crosse bandmates: “This, That and the Land” in 2016, “The Mrs. Hippy Sessions, Vol. 1” in 2017 and “True Story” in 2020. Going country didn’t exactly go against Hall’s nature. His first concert, after all, was Johnny Cash, and he named his second son Waylon, age 7 (he also has a 14-year-old son, Shay).

Over the years he’s shared bills with Todd Snider, Jackson Browne, Bill Miller, Shooter Jennings, Little Feat, Dave Simonett, Whey Jennings, Trampled by Turtles, just to name a few.

Church of Cash

Church of Cash

 

COVID-19 POLICY

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request. Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.

BAG POLICY

Small personal clutches / purses / fanny packs (max size 6.5″ x 4.5″ x 1″) or clear plastic / vinyl / PVC bags (max size 12″ x 12″ x 6″) are the only carry-in bags that are allowed.  We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.  Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Whether you are an ‘ol timer that grew up listening to Mr. Cash in your tractor or a young soldier driving your tank across the deserts of the Middle East with the Man in Black in your headphones, the Church of Cash will bring his music, with style and energy to fans everywhere.

What the Church of Cash has that no one else can match is their loyalty to the song and the message that Johnny left to all of us. The band merely keeps this word alive with a youthful spirit that has entertained audiences completely.

Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers

Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers

 

COVID-19 POLICY

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request. Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.

BAG POLICY

Small personal clutches / purses / fanny packs (max size 6.5″ x 4.5″ x 1″) or clear plastic / vinyl / PVC bags (max size 12″ x 12″ x 6″) are the only carry-in bags that are allowed.  We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.  Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

“Here’s to life!” Fans around the world can be found singing the chorus of the Roger Clyne-penned fan favorite “Mekong” and toasting their glasses in unison to celebrate life through rock-n-roll. But the inspiration for the song dates back to the time Roger went to Taipei, Taiwan, as a college student to teach English during the day and busk with his guitar at night for money.

Today, as Clyne prepares to record his 11th studio album, he continues to transform his life experiences, inspirations, observations and his own muses into timeless music. And whether he’s wearing his Converse high tops, boots or sandals, Clyne’s blend of punk rock, country-western and mariachi influences have made him, drummer PH Naffah, guitarist Jim Dalton and bassist Nick Scropos – collectively known as Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers – one of America’s best live rock-n-roll bands.

Starting with the seminal Tempe quartet, The Refreshments, Clyne and Naffah put the fun in rock during the 90s grunge era with a sense of humor. They also started what would become a trademark sound on all future albums by adding mariachi horns, something Clyne was influenced by while in college studying Cultural Anthropology with an ethnography study of mariachis during a three month immersion stay with a local family in Ensenada, Mexico.

The Refreshments’ debut album, “Fizzy, Fuzzy, Big & Buzzy,” became a cult classic. It produced the alternative radio hit “Banditos” which also had significant airplay on MTV and earned The Freshies an appearance on The Conan O’Brien Show. Clyne then penned and performed the theme song for the Mike Judge animated TV series, King of Hill. In 2017, Here’s to Life: The story of The Refreshments, was released. The feature-length documentary was a hit with fans and critics alike.

Changes within their record label and internal band issues resulted in Clyne and Naffah going on a vision quest of sorts in the Whetstone Mountains near the Clyne Ranch in Southeastern Arizona. It was there that Clyne found inspiration in the rolling hills and the jukeboxes of small town taverns that still played Marty Robbins and Johnny Cash – music he had shed from his youth in favor of bands like Camper Van Beethoven & They Might Be Giants. But after reconnecting with those old country records, Clyne and Naffah wrote and recorded under a new moniker what would become Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers’ debut album, “Honky Tonk Union.”

The album was the perfect combination of classic rock and twang, and fans immediately connected with it. Their independent release, “Honky Tonk Union,” debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s internet sales chart in 1999 prompting a call from a Billboard exec to their Manager demanding, “ Who the hell is Roger Clyne and why is he #1 on my chart?!” beating out much better known artists

RCPM released eight more albums that landed in the top ten of Billboard’s Internet Sales Chart, including a No. 1 debut for their third album, “Americano!” – all without the backing of a major record label and while flying under the radar of commercial radio.

In 2019, Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers were inducted into the Arizona Music and Entertainment Hall of Fame, joining the likes of fellow Arizona legends Alice Cooper, Buck Owens, Glen Campbell, Stevie Nicks, Linda Ronstadt and Waylon Jennings.

Later that fall, RCPM was invited by a man who, like Roger, also knows a little something about tequila and throwing big parties in Mexico. The band headlined Sammy Hagar’s Cabo Wabo Cantina on the eve of Hagar’s weekend birthday celebration.

Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers have curated their own annual music festival, Circus Mexicus, in the sleepy beach town of Puerto Peñasco, Mexico, which draws thousands of fans from around the world. The festival not only has a major impact on the local economy, but charity events hosted by the band and fans alike help raise money for a local orphanage, support local youth sports and help feed shelter animals.

Clyne not only sings about life in the border-lands, he also produces his own ultra-premium spirit, Mexican Moonshine Tequila (soon to be re-named Canción Tequila). Owned by the entire band, it was the official tequila at the Arizona Diamondbacks Chase stadium in 2016, 2017 and 2018. Started in 2011, the award-winning spirit is distributed in multiple states as well as Sonora, Mexico.

Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers have toured all over the US and achieved a faithful following through hard work and great music. They have done this all while being independent, without the safety net of a label or a label’s radio promotion department. Dubbed “The Springsteen of the Southwest,” by the Asbury Park Press. The band delivers exciting live performances that garner declarations like the one from emcee Jay Peterman of the Seinfeld TV show at Alice Cooper’s annual Christmas Pudding event, “Young man, you light that stage a-flame!”

Seaforth

Seaforth

 

COVID-19 POLICY

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request. Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.

BAG POLICY

Small personal clutches / purses / fanny packs (max size 6.5″ x 4.5″ x 1″) or clear plastic / vinyl / PVC bags (max size 12″ x 12″ x 6″) are the only carry-in bags that are allowed.  We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.  Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Australian country duo Seaforth is known for dropping infectious melodies, breezy lyrics and bangers with slick vocal harmonies that top every party playlist. Through their new EP What I Get For Loving You, Seaforth’s Tom Jordan and Mitch Thompson – childhood friends who take their name from the Sydney suburb where they grew up – want to expand popular perception to include
articulate, authentic songwriting that does a deeper dive into the human experience.

“It’s easy to just look at us like, ‘Oh, you guys are funny,’” said Tom – who produced the project entirely from the pair’s home studio. “Yeah, 100 percent. But at the end of the day, we are musicians. We are producing the songs, and we are writing the songs, and we have real stories to tell.”

The growth was hard-won for the pair who thought they were on the fast track to their dreams at the end of 2019. Seaforth had just finished opening shows in Sydney for their musical hero Keith Urban, was playing to full houses in Europe at Country 2 Country Festival, booked their first sold-out headlining show in Australia and felt like the world was at their feet. Then, the harsh reality of the pandemic isolated them from their careers, their friends, and held them captive a world away from their families in Australia.

“It was insane,” Tom said. “We were like, ‘What do we do?’ And we just sat around and tried new things because we couldn’t do what we were used to doing.”

They learned to cook. Mitch became an avid gardener, putting down his guitar for six months. Tom rededicated himself to growing his musical production skills, creating beats and melodies for no one in particular. Lacking inspiration, they didn’t write a song until the end of 2020.

They say fans on Instagram were a catalyst for snapping them out of their creative funk. A challenge circulating on the platform prompted artists to play an unreleased song. The duo’s
friends in Avenue Beat tagged them. Tom and Mitch posted a snip of the heart-wrenching “Breakups,” a song they’d been toying with, and watched thousands of people respond immediately.

“We’re like, ‘Let’s just tease,'” Tom said, explaining the feedback reinvigorated their confidence. “Let’s try and make music because that’s all we have.”

“It was the only thing we could control,” Mitch adds.

“Breakups,” a wounded, vulnerable, and utterly relatable relationship ballad, made Seaforth reexamine their songwriting craft and question the direction they wanted to take their new music. “Breakups,” included on What I Get For Loving You, is Tom’s personal story and the most profound song the duo has released. With 40 million on-demand streams to date, the track is also their most successful.

“What we realized is we’re always like, ‘Oh, this is a quote-unquote banger,'” Tom says. “Then you put out a song with such depth that came from literally the hardest emotional thing I’ve ever had to go through, and it’s done the best out of any song we’ve put out. We’ve spoken a lot about this recently that we have to show that side of us, too.”

Most of the songs on the EP were crafted in their Nashville home during lockdown. Tom harnessed his newly refined production skills, and the duo recorded the collection in a small room at home. They outsourced the players, trusted each other’s opinions and couldn’t be happier with the outcome.

They see the EP’s title track as the next chapter of “Breakups.” The title tells a tale, and they describe the collection as a love story of different emotions. They co-wrote “What I Get For Loving You” with Rocky Block, and the friends say the song’s lyrics are their best songwriting to date. The ballad also represents their music careers.

“‘What I Get For Loving You’ in general and writing, it’s like, ‘This is what we’re doing. We chose this path,’” Mitch says. “Everything that comes along with it, the ups and downs, that’s what we get for loving what we do. If you take a step back, it captures everything and just our journey in general.”

Other standout tracks on the EP include ” Queen of Daytona Beach (with Sean Kingston),” a breezy banger they also co-wrote with Block, featuring a sample from Kingston’s multi-Platinum smash. At the time, they penned the song at home during lockdown as a wish for where they would like to be.

“We ended up starting this relationship with Rocky then ended up becoming best mates with this dude because I think we needed each other,” Tom says. “He was going through his own situation professionally and personally as well.”

The production varies from down-home contemporary country on “Good Beer,” their duet with Jordan Davis, to wildly progressive in “Dr. Phil.” They attribute the swing to their Australian upbringing.

“Being an international person in Nashville, you obviously have international influences,” Tom says. “We were raised on very different music than someone from the middle of Georgia, but it all ties into country music for us, and that’s why we’re here. Our goal was always to be an authentic version of ourselves because that’s what country music is about. It’s about authentic stories and about relating to people. I feel like producing and writing everything is as authentic as it can possibly get.”

While 2020 didn’t work out as planned for them, they emerged with a group of songs sure to turn heads – and volume knobs. Seaforth is plunging into this EP release with an impressive 340 million global on-+demand streams and a Gold-certified single for their Mitchell Tenpenny duet “Anything She Says.”

Tom Jordan and Mitch Thompson left Australia to come to Nashville and play their brand of country music. In that way, the fast track led to their dreams with a few unexpected bumps along the way. “We do have real stories to tell,” Tom says. “We want to make sure people know that.”

Southern Culture On The Skids

Southern Culture On The Skids

 

COVID-19 POLICY

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request. Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.

BAG POLICY

Small personal clutches / purses / fanny packs (max size 6.5″ x 4.5″ x 1″) or clear plastic / vinyl / PVC bags (max size 12″ x 12″ x 6″) are the only carry-in bags that are allowed.  We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.  Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Southern Culture On The Skids has been consistently recording and touring around the world since 1983. The band (Rick Miller – guitar and vocals, Mary Huff – bass and vocals, Dave Hartman – drums) has been playing together for over 30 years. Their musical journey has taken them from all-night North Carolina house parties to late night TV talk shows (Conan O’Brien, The Tonight Show), from performing at the base of Mt. Fuji in Japan to rockin’ out for the inmates at North Carolina correctional facilities. They’ve shared a stage with many musical luminaries including Link Wray, Loretta Lynn, Hasil Adkins and Patti Smith. Their music has been featured in movies and TV, parodied by Weird Al, and used to sell everything from diamonds to pork sausage. In 2014 the band was honored by the Southern Folklife Collection at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill with an exhibition featuring their music and cultural contributions. Their legendary live shows are a testament to the therapeutic powers of foot-stomping, butt-shaking rock and roll and what Rolling Stone dubbed “a hell raising rock and roll party.”

At Home with Southern Culture on the Skids is the latest full length album from the band and was released in March of 2021. It was recorded during the stay at home period of the pandemic when the band was at home and not touring. The album consists of 11 tracks recorded and mixed in Rick Miller’s living room with some additional tracks recorded at his studio, The Kudzu Ranch.

The first radio single off the album is “Run Baby Run”—a rocking number with deep garage roots. SCOTS bassist Mary Huff provides an urgent vocal while the band pulls back the throttle on a full race fuzz fest—cause she’s gotta to go fast! Run Baby Run!

The other songs on the album are a combination of the band’s unique mix of musical genres: rock and roll, surf, folk and country—all a bit off-center, what Rick proudly calls “our wobbly Americana”. Rick goes on, “We put a few more acoustic guitars on this one, as you would expect if you recorded in your living room, but it still rocks like SCOTS. So put your headphones on, get in your favorite chair/sofa/recliner, put on “At Home With” and let’s hang out for a while.”

Guitar riffs as lumpy as a camel, rough as a jackhammer or smooth and bright as Tennessee sippin’ whiskey, all slung loose and loud over salacious beats – No Depression

For over thirty years, Southern Culture On The Skids have played an eclectic range of Americana including rockabilly, surf rock, country and R&B, with a punk edge and heaps of humor. They are known for their legendary live shows and wacky antics…But it’s more than just great fun; they are fantastic musicians to boot. – Elmore Magazine

This Chapel Hill-based trio is flat-out amazing. Without resorting to needless flash or attention-hungry showboating, Miller in particular is one of the most spectacularly gifted guitar players I’ve ever seen. He juggles a lot of styles – country, garage rock, surf, rockabilly and soul to name just a few. – Stomp & Stammer

Nikki Lane <br>Denim and Diamonds Tour

Nikki Lane
Denim and Diamonds Tour

 

COVID-19 POLICY

Based on the latest local guidelines, attendees are no longer required to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test AND/OR vaccination for entry into this event. Other shows on our calendar may still have specific health and safety requirements based on artist request. Be sure to check our venue website for the latest updates and guidelines as entry requirements are subject to change.

BAG POLICY

Small personal clutches / purses / fanny packs (max size 6.5″ x 4.5″ x 1″) or clear plastic / vinyl / PVC bags (max size 12″ x 12″ x 6″) are the only carry-in bags that are allowed.  We encourage you to pack light with only the necessities to make the entry process as smooth as possible.  Exceptions will be made for necessary medical equipment and bags for nursing mothers.

PAYMENT POLICY

We are a cashless facility meaning that we are unable to accept cash as a form of payment. Our Box Office and Coat Check will only accept credit and debit. Our Bars will only accept credit, debit, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. Please note that artist merchandise sales are separate and may still accept cash.

 

Nikki Lane’s stunning third album Highway Queen sees the young Nashville singer emerge as one of country and rock’s most gifted songwriters. Co-produced by Lane and fellow singer-songwriter, Jonathan Tyler, this emotional tour-de-force was recorded at Matt Pence’s Echo Lab studio in Denton, Texas as well as at Club Roar with Collin Dupuis in Nashville, Tennessee. Blending potent lyrics, unbridled blues guitars and vintage Sixties country-pop swagger, Lane’s new music will resonate as easily with Lana Del Rey and Jenny Lewis fans as those of Neil Young and Tom Petty.

Highway Queen is a journey through heartbreak that takes exquisite turns. The record begins with a whiskey-soaked homage to Lane’s hometown (“700,000 Rednecks”) and ends on the profoundly raw “Forever Lasts Forever,” where Lane mourns a failed marriage — the “lighter shade of skin” left behind from her wedding ring. On “Forever” and the confessional “Muddy Waters,” Lane’s lyrics align her with perceptive songwriters like Nick Lowe and Cass McCombs. Elsewhere, “Companion” is pure Everly Brothers’ dreaminess (“I would spend a lifetime/ Playing catch you if I can”). She goes on a Vegas bender on the rollicking “Jackpot,” fights last-call blues (“Foolish Heart”) and tosses off brazen one-liners at a backroom piano (“Big Mouth”).

“Love is the most unavoidable thing in the world,” Lane says. “The person you pick could be half set-up to destroy your life with their own habits — I’ve certainly experienced that before and taken way too long to get out of that mistake.”

In 2014, Lane’s second album All or Nothin’ (New West) solidified her sandpaper voice beneath a ten-gallon hat as the new sound and look of outlaw country music. Produced by Dan Auerbach, the record’s bluesy Western guitars paired with Lane’s Dusty Springfield-esque voice earned glowing reviews from NPR, the Guardian and Rolling Stone. In three years since her Walk of Shame debut, Lane said she was living most of the year on the road.

Growing up, Lane used to watch her father pave asphalt during blistering South Carolina summers. She’d sit on the roller (“what helps smooth out the asphalt”) next to a guy named Rooster and divvy out Hardee’s lunch orders for the workers. “My father thought he was a country singer,” Lane laughs. “He partied hard at night, but by 6:30 AM he was out on the roads in 100-degree weather.” That’s the southern work ethic, she says. “We didn’t have a lot of money, but I was privileged with the knowledge of how to work hard, how to learn and to succeed when things aren’t set up for me.” Creativity was an unthinkable luxury, she adds. “When people told me I should try to get a record deal for songs I was writing, I was like, ‘that’s cute — I’ve got to be at work at 10 A.M.'”

“Becoming a songwriter is one of the most selfish things I’ve ever done,” Lane says plainly. She describes writing her first song at age 25 like it was a necessary act of self-preservation after a devastating breakup. Many of her early songs, she said on Shame and Nothin,’ were about the fleetingness of relationships she believed were permanent, she says. Lane’s main line of work in those days was a fashion entrepreneur (she’s currently the owner of Nashville’s vintage clothing boutique High Class Hillbilly). It brought her to cities around the country, New York to Los Angeles to Nashville. And like a true wanderer, Lane’s sound crisscrosses musical genres with ease, while the lonesome romantic in her remains. Even a soft song like, “Send The Sun,” with its lilting downward strum, is flush with bittersweet emotion. “Darling, we’re staring at the same moon,” Lane sings lovingly. “I used to say that to my ex,” she says with cheerful stoicism, “to try to brighten the long nights, stay positive.”

Highway Queen is poised to be Lane’s mainstream breakthrough. “Am I excited to spend years of my life in a van, away from family and friends? No, but I’m excited to share my songs, so they’ll reach people and help them get through whatever they’re going through. To me, that’s worth it.”

“Lay You Down” is one of those unexpected moments for Lane. “That song was inspired by something Levon Helm’s wife posted on Facebook when he was sick with cancer,” Lane says. “I was just so moved by her telling the world how much love he felt from people writing to them, and moved that because of the Internet, I was able to see that love — even from a distance.” The song became surreal for Lane and her band when her longtime guitarist, Alex Munoz, was diagnosed with cancer while they were playing it. “It deepened my perspective and the importance of keeping everyone safe,” says Lane.

On the record cover, Lane looks out on wide, unowned Texan plains, leaning on the fearsome horns of a massive steer. Wearing a vintage Victorian dress, the stark photo invokes a time before highways existed. The symbolism isn’t lost on Lane. Highway Queen was a pioneering moment for her as an artist.

“I was always a smart girl, always had to yell to be heard,” she says, “But this was the first time in my career where I decided how things were going to go; I was willing to take the heat.” Lane included the bonus track “Champion” as a small testament to that empowerment. “It makes a point,” Lane says with a smile, “That I appreciate what you’re saying, but get the fuck out of my way.”